FROM ELVISH TO KLINGON PDF

and Suriel Mofu · A grammar of Kharia, a South Munda language, by John Peterson · From Elvish to Klingon: Exploring invented languages, edited by Michael. Apart from languages derived from science fiction and fantasy worlds, From Elvish to Klingon includes investigative accounts of international auxiliary languages. From Elvish to Klingon has ratings and 24 reviews. Nikki said: This book is along the same lines as Arika Okrent’s In the Land of Invented Languages.

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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. From Elvisu to Klingon: Exploring Invented Languages by Michael Adams. From the Elvish language Tolkien invented for denizens of Middle Earth to the science fiction lingo spoken by the Klingons in Star Trek, writers have always endeavored to create new forms of expression, not only in the English language, but in languages that exist only in their own imaginations.

Now, in From Elvish to Klingon: Exploring Invented Languages, a group of leadi From the Elvish language Tolkien invented for denizens of Middle Earth to the science fiction lingo spoken by the Klingons in Star Trek, writers have always endeavored to create new forms of expression, not only in the English language, but in languages that exist only in their own imaginations. Exploring Invented Languages, a group of leading linguists offers a lively investigation of all manner of invented languages.

Each chapter focuses on a different language, or group of languages, and explores the origins, purpose, and usage of these curious artifacts of culture. We learn about the new languages invented to enhance the experience of video and online games, from the complexities of Gargish, the language of gargoyles in Ultima VI, to Simlish, the klinton expressive language of The Sims, andthe entirely exclusionary klinbon satirical language of international gamers.

We also learn about the futuristic languages, Newspeak and Nadsat, invented by George Orwell and Klingln Burgess in their dystopian novels and A Clockwork Orange, and many more. The book explores all aspects of invented languages–their unique grammar, vocabulary, and usage–and includes fascinating analysis of sample dialogues and expressions. Written by experts in their fields, chapters cover such topics as International Auxiliary Languages, Invented Vocabularies, Literary “Nonsense,” and Language Reconstruction and Renewal.

It’s all “maj” good as the Klingons would say, or “doubleplusgood,” as a “duckspeaker” in Orwell’s might observe. For anyone wanting to understand more fully the intricacies and attractions of invented languages, From Elvish to Klingon offers the most thorough study of the subject available today.

From Elvish to Klingon: Exploring invented languages, edited by Michael Adams : Linguistic Typology

Hardcoverpages. Published October 27th by Oxford University Press. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask kllingon readers questions about From Elvish to Klingonplease sign up. Be the first to ask a question about From Elvish to Klingon. Lists with This Book.

Linguistic Typology

Dec 13, Nikki rated it liked it Shelves: Lacking the context, that particular essay was just… well, rather boring, ffrom me. Very few people, if any, have matched that in terms of creating a language for the pleasure of it and creating a way for other people to enjoy it. Jul 31, Simon rated it liked it Shelves: A mixed bag of essays on invented languages.

Here are brief rundowns on the essays, and a general comment after that: The Spectrum of Invention Michael Adams. A kind of introduction to some of the conceptual issues that arise in thinking about invented languages.

I found this mostly frustrating for its breeziness. International Auxiliary Languages Arden Smith. An excellent, serious account of the attempts to create languages to facilitate communication either worldwide A mixed bag of essays on invented languages. An excellent, serious account of the attempts to create languages to facilitate communication either worldwide or in some restricted part of the world.

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It gives a clear and wonderful account of the early 17th century attempts at “real characters” i. Also strong on Volapuk umlaut on the u and Esperanto.

Tries kilngon examine the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis in this context but doesn’t really make anything of it. A lot of unnecessary detail e. Weiner and Jeremy Marshall.

A thorough and scholarly account of the Elvish languages in Tolkien and a little on the non-Elvish ones too. Some parts were very interesting, and they certainly make you gasp in astonishment at Tolkien’s achievement. But a lot of this is not of much interest unless you are really into morphology. A mish-mash of sociology who speaks Klingon and whymorphology, and the material constraints on the invention and development of Klingon imposed by the needs of the TV and movie products for which it was developed.

Some pseudo-philosophical reflections on language-games and descriptions of various languages associated with video games. The analyses of bits of Joyce were sometimes interesting but often seemed elvosh get somewhat unmoored from the text.

Ultimately, annoying lit crit stuff that made me grind my teeth. An absolutely riveting account of the perils and the prizes associated with attempts to revive languages, including Hebrew, Hawaiian, Breton, Irish, Cornish, and Maori, and a few others.

In many cases, the attempts to revive a language are middle-class and hegemonic, further alienating the dwindling numbers of traditional grom, who are, of course, doomed anyway. To each of these chapters, the editor, Michael Adams, adds an appendix, usually not very klungon supplementary material e.

My biggest disappointment was over the failure of the book to engage, anywhere, with the question of what a language is. This is a fro that is klijgon rarely addressed, but seems to me difficult and interesting. It would have been particularly appropriate here, since if one is looking at invented languages, one is clearly presupposing something about what a language is i.

Most philosophers, I suspect, would say that a language is a set ,lingon lexical items and syntactic rules interpreting syntax very broadly here to include all formal structures such as phonology, morphology, etc. And this seems to be the implicit understanding in this book of what a language is, since the inventors in question seem generally to invent vocabularies and syntactic principles. But in spite of the appeal of this account of what a language is, it has the implausible consequence that the addition to a language of a single new word produces a new language this follows from the principles governing the identities of sets.

Although of course languages change, and become different, it does not follow from this that they change into other, or different languages, any more than a piece of fruit that ripens, and hence becomes different, becomes a different piece of fruit. Whatever a language elvihs, a plausible theory ought to allow that a single language can undergo change.

I don’t know what the answer to this problem is; but it ought to have been at least addressed in a kpingon like this. Aug 06, Chris Fellows rated it really liked it. The title of this book leads the reader to expect it will be similar to Arika Okrent’s “In the Land of Invented Languages”, but it covers that particular territory rather more superficially and casts klinfon net a good deal wider.

It covers both instances of linguistic invention that fall short of inventing a whole language such as Newspeak, Nadsat, and various Joycean lexifabricographical framjamkinisations and the opposite case where linguistic invention is applied to extending an existing natur The title of this book leads the reader to expect it will be similar to Arika Okrent’s “In the Land of Invented Languages”, klinngon it covers that particular territory rather more superficially and casts its net a good deal wider.

It covers both instances of linguistic invention that fall short of inventing elvisj whole language such as Newspeak, Nadsat, ffrom various Joycean lexifabricographical framjamkinisations and the opposite case where linguistic invention is applied to extending an existing natural language with a limited vocabulary.

Being an edited book, rather than a single author one, the quality of the chapters was uneven, but I liked them all. The one on computer game languages misses an opportunity by failing to notice how much the currency of Sindarin has been extended by ‘Lord of the Rings Online’ I am sure the number of people who recognise the elvksh ‘mae govannen’ has increased many-fold since this game came out.

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For me, the high points frok the discussion of Tolkien’s languages the chapter hits a good middle ground between what you might find in a biography and the full Sindarin grammars and suchlike available online ; of the Russian-based teenage slang in ‘A Clockwork Orange’; and of the political and cultural problems that arise klinngon nationalist enthusiasts try to ‘bring back’ a moribund language.

This last made me aware of a lot of problems I had not previously thought about. For example, the predominantly rural and aging native speakers of languages like Hawaiian or Breton usually klinbon languages heavily permeated with loan words anathema to the educated young enthusiasts and are likely to be unwelcoming of an alien new ‘standard’ that tries to iron-out local variations.

Dec 04, Rich Daley rated it liked it. Invented languages hold a deep fascination for me, and this book covers every kind: There was a lot of stuff in here I didn’t know and I feel much more educated about invented languages, especially the political side of revitalizing language and the reasons why people might not want to let English Invented languages hold a deep fascination for me, and this book covers every kind: There was a lot of stuff in here I elviish know and I feel much more educated about invented languages, especially the political side of revitalizing language and the reasons why people might not want to let English dominate everywhere.

It’s a pretty hard read, though. It’s basically a collection of academic papers including one of Adams’s owneach with an “Appendix” written by Adams on a tangential subject. The papers are presented in their entirety which means they are littered with citations and contain perhaps far more detail than is necessary for a light read. May 06, Dr. Andrew Higgins rated koingon it was amazing. This is a very fom written book with a really good survey of the development of constructed and auxiliary languages like Volapuk and Esperanto.

There is a big focus on Tolkien’s languages well explained and Klingon. Adams also includes chapters on James Joyce and revitalized language like Modern Hebrew, Cornish and Irish, His chapter on language developed for computer games going all the way be to the Gargish of Ultima 6 elvlsh ones back.

Good appendices on each language with excellent bibl This is a very well written book with a really good survey of the development of constructed and auxiliary languages like Volapuk and Esperanto.

Good appendices on each language with excellent bibliography for follow-up. Very useful in my studies. Highly recommend -got me think about spending more elvissh with my own secret vice!!! Aug 31, Victor rated it really liked it. Perhaps the nerdiest book I’ve read in a long time. Which means of course that I loved it. Also, directly responsible for rekindling the always likely-to-burst-into-open-flame voracious disgusting gluttony of Kllingon book consuming that I’m currently engaged in there are five books by or about Tolkien on my nightstand presently.

And that’s counting LOTR as one book. Mar 24, Kathryn Lane rated it really liked it. This is a very, very good book. Well worth a read as the analysis is comprehensive and factually accurate. Aug 02, Stewart rated it really liked it. Klingoon interest me, not just those languages spoken by millions or billions of people, but languages invented for specific purposes, not necessarily spoken by anyone. The book examines languages like Esperanto, created to be a world language and to promote world peace.

Esperanto was invented in by Elvih.